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The word “hemiola” originates from the Greek words “hemi,” meaning half, and “holos,” meaning whole. In other words, one and a half. And so, a hemiola is a rhythmic pattern that uses a ratio of three to two, and the Greeks, ever concerned with ratios, noticed that three divided by two gives you one and a half, thus their description “hemiola.”

The second course in the Faders Up series, Advanced Mix Techniques is structured quite differently from the first. Here, you’ll gain insights from renowned sound engineers, but it’ll be much more tightly focused, both on their personal sound-crafting techniques and the tried-and-true techniques that pertain to specific genres (hip-hop, rock, metal, pop, and cinematic orchestral). We even threw in an entire section on the basics of mastering as an added bonus.

Modern equipment is incredibly versatile. Sometimes a Swiss army knife unit can take the place of several other pieces of your gear arsenal. If you have something else that does the job just as well, why bother keeping both?

Grants for music students

Anyway, shout out to Zedd for sneaking in an Am chord there. It took me a while to notice it. Form-wise, the chorus is a different length each time with some variations, and — wait, hold up… is this a Target commercial?

Be careful here. Don’t turn it up too loud and fool yourself into liking the result just because it’s louder. Do your best to match the input volume with the output volume of the compressor. We tend to think louder is better when it’s not really better, it’s just louder. Here’s a short video tutorial I shot below to show all of this in action on a mix I’ve started. Check it out!

BMI tracks music and collects from a wide variety of sources spanning commercial, college, and public radio, network and local TV, commercial music services, music venues and more.

Free Form is fun to experiment with as there it features no rigid structure. You can write however you want, whatever you want. The danger with Free Form is that you’ve still got to ensure that there is enough melodic “ear candy” or motif usage so that the listener will have something to grab onto and remember your work.

Originally recorded for a Live-Aid concert, the video was voted one of the worst of all time by an NME survey. I, however, find it hilarious and always get a kick out of it. I’d like to think, based off of how goofy Jagger and Bowie are acting in the video, they were thinking the same thing.

Best rappers of 2019

“Better Now”: So, how the heck does Post Malone do his vibrato thing, anyway? Another thing he does that’s uniquely him is that he really likes to sing different melodies in all the verse areas. It’s just not standard practice how often he does it. You’re making my form labels fall apart, Post, knock it off! Wait, your name is a form label… ouch, my brain!

Say what you want about rap metal, Rage Against the Machine brought it. They brought their supreme rhythmic tightness and their politically leaning message, which is more pertinent now than ever. In the mid-’90s, they were blowing up, and they were asked to play SNL. (I can only guess that after this incident, whoever asked them to play was fired.)

Here’s Dr. Ericsson again: “You have to know whether you are doing something right and, if not, how you’re going wrong.” The good news for us musicians is that practicing music has a built-in feedback mechanism — you can generally hear it when you play something wrong, even more so as you get better or if you record yourself playing. This is different from say learning a language in a vacuum where you would have no idea if your pronunciation was right or wrong.

“Meant to Be”: We’ve got a very cool, non-standard “shuffle treatment” of a chorus here. The chorus itself is AABA, and after the second chorus they chop it up and shuffle it to make a new section that goes BBA, which I’m going to call a modified half-chorus (c2). Then, we have the shortest bridge in history, just two pop-perfect bars of “maybe”s. Next we’ve got a more proper “non-chopped” half-chorus to end it. And we gotta give a shout-out to the inverted V chord they snuck in there with the moving bass line in the chorus.

“Happier”: Wait, no… what are you… no! Not the dog, come on, man, not the dog, what are you doing to me, Marshmello? Okay, so here’s a form I’m not adequately equipped to categorize or compare to anything else: what’s stumping me is what to do with the three-bar space in between the pre-chorus and the solid chorus/refrain that’s introduced at the beginning. For now, I’m lumping it in with the chorus as part of a chorus variation. But you could also think of it as an extended part of the pre-chorus, especially as its lyric is taken from it. Or, I guess we could even call it an “interlude.” It’s slippery. I have to highlight the half-bridge that ends the song — you almost never see half-bridges.

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